Symptoms what-is-addiction

Drug Addiction Clues And Indicators

While the signs are noticed by the doctor and people around the addict, the symptoms are known to the addict alone. An example of a symptom is a patient reporting sleepiness while a sign would be someone noticing dilated pupils.

Dependence on a substance - the person who is addicted to a substance like alcohol or drugs loses the ability to decide when to use and when not to use such. They keep taking it, despite the fact that it might bring about mischief (the individual could conceivably know about the potential damage).


Drug addiction can lead to strong cravings. It's possible that the addict wants to stop taking the substance but finds it really hard to do so on his or her own.


The clues and indicators that someone is addicted differ from one person to the other, depend on the drug, the genes of the individual and status in life.

The clues and indicators of addiction could be that

  • It becomes difficult for the person to desist from using the substance - like drug, alcohol or nicotine, even when the person has attempted to stop at least on one occasion.
  • Withdrawal symptoms - when the body levels of that drug drop below a specific level, a patient experiences mood-related and physical symptoms. Other signs are an uncontrollable need to take the drug, short temper, irritability, short temper, loss of concentration, hopelessness, lack of purpose, annoyance, rage, offense, and animosity.
  • A sudden increase in appetite might happen. Sleeplessness is a typical symptom of withdrawal. Constant vomiting and constipation may also occur in some situations. Depending on the substance, withdrawal might also cause violence, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and sweating.
  • Addiction proceeds in spite of medical issue awareness - the individual keeps taking the substance frequently, despite the fact that they have created diseases associated to it. An example is a smoker who doesn't stop smoking even after lung or heart problems begin.
  • Social sacrifices happen as activities are given up because of the addiction. Examples of this might be an alcoholic who won't attend a party if there isn't going to alcohol available or a smoker who won't meet up with friends at a non-smoking restaurant.
  • Keeping a good reserve - addicts will at all times ensure that they have a good reserve of the substance, even when they do not have a lot of cash. To ensure that the substance is as abundant as possible, sacrifices may be made to the household's budget.
  • Risky behaviours (1) - users will take unnecessary risks to make sure they can get the substance, like stealing or trading sex for money or drugs.
  • Taking risks (2) - driving at a higher speed is one of the risks the addict may easily take when they have taken the substance.
  • Dealing with problems - they always have the belief that they cannot handle their issues without drugs.
  • Pre-occupation - A user exhausts himself and his time working out ways of obtaining the drug and figuring out how to use it.
  • Loneliness and secrecy - in several instances addicts might use the substance on their own, or even secretly.
  • Denial - most people suffering from addiction refuse to admit it. They either do not know or will not acknowledge that there is a problem.
  • Excess consumption - the individual takes too much of drugs, nicotine or alcohol in some cases of addiction. The effects can be physical symptoms, like a bad lasting cough (in the case of heavy smokers) and a sore throat, or blackouts (fail to remember moments).
  • Dropping hobbies and activities - with time, the person may start shying away from those activities that makes him happy before. This may even be the situation with smokers who discover they can't physically adapt to participating in their most loved game.
  • Having reserves - the addict might have small reserves of his/her substance concealed in various areas of the car/house; frequently in improbable spots.
  • Binging - Taking a lot of the substance at the beginning. The individual may swallow drinks down with a specific end goal to get plastered and after that vibe great.
  • Clashing with the law - this is more typical of certain alcohol and drug dependencies (e.g. not nicotine). This might be since the drug weakens good sense and the person takes a risk he/she would not take if he/she were not intoxicated, or in an attempt to get his/hands on the substance, he/she does something illegal.
  • Money problems - if buying the substance causes a financial burden, and addict might sacrifice other things to make sure the supply is maintained. Even cigarettes that in certain places, like the United Kingdom, regions of Europe and the United States of America cost more than '11 just for a packet of twenty cigarettes - someone who smokes 40 a day in such a place will have to spend '660 per month, almost '8,000 annually.
  • Relationship issues - these problems are more typical with alcohol or drug dependency.

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Certain alcohol or substance abusers who aren't technically addicted might also be affected by or cause a few of the above-mentioned descriptions, though these abusers don't generally experience the withdrawal symptoms of addicts or the exact same obsession to use the substance.